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67 CAMARO


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Decided to take on this project, just to see how the other half lives. We found this pig on Craigslist, advertised by a nice young man just outside of Topeka KS. After loading it up and hauling it home in the snow and slush, several people looked at the car and seemed to think it was familiar to them. General concensus was that it had spent its life in this area, and had a variety of owners and drivetrains throughout its life. The last time it was driven it was piloted into a stationary object of some sort (tree/pole). The front sheet metal had been replaced with a bunch of Goodmark pieces, but it still had an obvious bend in the front subframe. We gathered up a straight subframe, blasted and painted it, replaced the bushings, ball joints, and installed new rotors/calipers/pads/bearings and hoses.

The engine is a bone stock 350 fitted with an Edelbrock dual plane intake and 1406 carb with manual choke, long tube headers and a 7 quart Milodon oil pan. Transmission is a Doug Nash 4 speed. We steamed the engine and trans off and re-painted the engine after replacing a couple seeping gaskets. After installing it back into the finished subframe, we put on a new smaller sized electronic distributor, remote coil and plug wires. Simple electronic ignition without that massive GM looking honker of a distributor. Has a recently rebuilt radiator. The wiring harness under the hood was probably the original one, and had to be replaced. We hand built a new harness for it, for a better, cleaner fit. Charging system was upgraded to a new internally regulated unit to do away with the external regulator and help clean up the area.  

When we got the car and put it up on the lift, noticed an odd piece for a rear end--E body Dana 60 with 354 gears. The thing had been hung in there years ago without any modifications to the mounting pads. To say the least, it stayed in there about another 12 hours. It was replaced bu a 354 geared  GM 10 bolt with new axel bearings, seals, brake shoes/cylinders/drums. Fresh normal stuff. With the new rear end installed and still without the front subframe assembly, it was then prepared to be sent off to the body shop for paint and bodywork.

Front fenders, hood, header panel, inner fenders, rear quarters, outer rear wheelhouses and drivers door skin are new Goodmark pieces and were prepared for paint. The quarters were replaced because years ago someone had installed big hideous fender flares in an attempt to compensate for  light wheel opening rust. There were some minor pinholes in the front floorboards and they were also replaced at this time. Trunklid was changed out for a better one, and a more correct rear spoiler was fitted to it. During the bodyworking process, they noticed that the roof had also been re-skinned decades ago, and the passengers door had been replaced. Seems that about the only original piece is the tail light panel. Remarkably, the front and back glass trim and bumpers fit well. With that much sheet metal being replaced or traded out there is a good possibility that there could be 'issues', but not in this case--we were very lucky. At this point, the engine/trans/subframe was installed for sheetmetal fitting. After fitting, primer, blocking, and shooting all the jams, painter shot correctly tinted Hugger Orange PPG basecoat. Classic Industries supplied the 69 SS stripe template and again PPG white paint was applied. Note: Get off my case about the stripes being farther apart on the back than the front. Thats the way they were on the 69's, and 69 is the only year you could get a cowl hood and SS stripes, so thats the way it is. The whole car was then cleared with PPG Concept clear, wet sanded and buffed. Somewhere in all this, the painted interior parts were refinished in gloss black.

With the car back at our shop, the new interior began going in. Windows and tracks were cleaned/replaced/repaired and fitted. All the new weatherstripping went in and the floors were covered with high density close cell insulation to cut down on heat and noise entering the passenger compartment. 160 MPH speedometer and standard instrument cluster, new dash pad and center faceplate were installed. New standard door panels, arm rests and bases, carpet, sun visors and carpet. Seats were re-covered in a stock standard pattern by Evans Upholstery in Cottonwood Falls KS (620-273-8557). Eddie did an excellent job free-hand sewing the covers, cleaning and adjusting the tracks and getting them back to us for less than the covers would have cost in a box. Headliner, seat backs and pillar pieces were dyed black.

Exhaust system consists of long tube headers connected to a stock 2-1/4" full factory style exhaust, with the muffler hanging where it should, and chrome tips out the back. It all fit well and keeps the car quiet without it sounding like a random 5.0 Mustang with Flowmasters. Another 'normal' feature that is easily modified to fit a new owners needs. Subframe connectors were welded in place to help stiffen the car and preserve the integrity of the body. 15x7 & 15x8 rallye wheels with a matched set of tires round out the running gear.  

 


When we started
Whacked original subframe (ouch!)

After
Fresh subframe